Online misunderstandings can also result from excessive clarity

t is often assumed that online discussions escalate because people become less socially concerned when they are anonymous, or because online messages are unclear and easily misunderstood. In her PhD-dissertation, which she defended on September 22, Carla Roos reveals that the opposite is often the case: online communication is sometimes so clear that it can make people appear antisocial.

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An anatomical look inside brain ’P-0255’

Who hasn’t wanted to look inside someone’s head, especially when that person is acting strangely? A look into the brain can indeed be revealing, both from a medical and neuropsychological point of view, but also from an educational one. This is literally the case with ’P-0255’. But P-0255 is not an old personnel number as a colleague suspected, nor is it a neuroimaging scan; it is the number of a specimen from the University Museum’s pathological brain collection that shows a particular form of traumatic brain injury: a coup contre-coup.

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Why teaching your (grand)parents how the computer works is so challenging: The Neuroscience of Learning and Healthy Aging

Learning helps us cope with changes in our surroundings, and also find the best neighborhood ice cream parlor. Yet, it usually becomes harder as we get older. Thankfully, scientific findings show that it doesn’t always have to be that way.

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Some call it a lack of orientation. I call it an invitation to the playground.

“I am 30 years old, and I will finish my Ph.D in organizational psychology this summer. You can imagine that people frequently ask me about my career plans. Depending on the situation, I tell them different things. But the truth is: I have absolutely no clue!” Close to the finishing line of her PhD, Anne-Kathrin Kleine shares her view on career goals.

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Learning about time in the University Museum

Academics should get out from their ‘Ivory Tower’, and invest more into bringing research to the public. Certainly, this critique is a sting felt by those working in cognitive neuroscience: the majority of our field relies on data acquired with repetitive, highly controlled experimental setups. These allow researchers to test fundamental models of how human […]

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