Justice for me, but not for thee? Identities, due process, and safety

Dealing with harm in organizations can be tricky. In this post, Maja Graso explores a particularly difficult issue: How do people assess allegations of harm that they have not seen themselves and that leave no evidence, no witnesses, and no other reliable signal that the harm has actually occurred (e.g., “my word against yours” cases)?

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We’ve got your signal!

Most people know that electroencephalography (EEG) measures brain activity. But probably few know that the first measurement of the human EEG came from an attempt to scientifically test telepathy, and even fewer that one of the first EEG devices from Groningen inspired the founding of a Dutch company. This blog post provides interesting historical insights into the measurement technique of EEG and it’s relation to Psychology in Groningen.

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The blessing and the curse of classifying neuroimaging data

Machine learning in cognitive neuroscience In modern cognitive neuroscience, it has become common-practice to apply machine learning techniques to data obtained through neuroimaging. Despite this widespread use, however, there is something amazingly enigmatic about it. On the one hand, there is this organ that for millennia has eluded scholars: billions of neurons connected in myriads […]

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A forgiving cycle path: preventing bicycle crashes in the elderly

Cyclists are vulnerable, and particularly older cyclists have an increased risk of crashing. Therefore, Frank Westerhuis and his colleagues from the traffic psychology group investigated countermeasures to increase cyclists’ safety. This blog post reveals whether they were succesful in achieving this by using illusionary objects next to the cycle path.

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